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#41 Solar System

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Posted 16 July 2012 - 07:21 PM

Newser or Ginnyfan, I bet you'll be able to answer this question. Unless it's an outrageously big story, CNNI seems to be rather nonchalant when covering stories from South America. Is this due to their own self-imposed geographical breakdown between sister organizations?


CNNI: covers Middle East, Africa, Asia, Europe and Oceania
CNN ESP: covers Mexico and South America
CNN USA: covers North America: Well maybe I should adjust that to U.S. because Canadian stories are rare on CNN USA

Just curious.

#42 newser

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Posted 16 July 2012 - 09:10 PM

That's a very good question, SS.

I can remember a time when reports from across Latin America could be seen on a pretty regular basis. Nowadays, it seems as if CNN has almost given up on covering that part of the world.

For years, Lucia Newman (now with al Jazeera) has been the most visible reporter from the region. She was stationed in Havana, but has traveled around South America a lot.

Then there was a bureau in Mexico City which had a permanent correspondent once. That was Harris Whitbeck who has also traveled and reported extensively on all the key stories from the region. He left CNN about four years ago and his position is still vacant.

I can also remember a permanent Buenos Aires correspondent Luis Clemens, who is now with NPR and Marina Mirabella was Rio de Janeiro bureau chief (I believe they closed the bureau when she left a while back).

And most recently Karl Penhaul, who was stationed in Colombia, left CNN without anyone replacing him.


Today, there are only two permanent correspondents in Latin America - Patrick Oppmann in Havana and Shasta Darlington in Sao Paulo. But, judging by the frequency of their reports, you couldn't tell CNN has bureaus there at all.

Any breaking news events are usually covered by Rafael Romo from Atlanta, while US based correspondents occasionally travel to Mexico (most recent example: presidential elections a few weeks ago). Sometimes a CNN en Espanol anchor or reporter is invited to give more details and perspective of what's going on, but that's also done in Atlanta. There have been a few reports from Bryan Byrnes, a freelancer based in Buenos Aires. He covered the Chile quake in 2010 and filed a few reports about CNNI executives' obsession - football.

The overall problem with CNN's coverage is that many stories that could/should be treated as breaking news (or just the news) are almost ignored. For example, there was a crisis in Paraguay just about a month ago which could be interpreted as a soft coup, but CNNI covered it sporadically and, of course, it was done from Atlanta with pictures from local TV station. To be fair, this happens with many other stories from the rest of the world as well. I see no difference between Mohammed Jamjoom sitting in Abu Dhabi studio and reporting about Bahrain, Diana Magnay standing in Berlin and reporting about a trial in Oslo or Rafael Romo sitting in Atlanta and talking about Paraguay.

As for the geographical breakdown theory, if it's correct, it obviously isn't working. CNNE correspondents stationed in Latin America almost never file reports for CNNI or CNN US.

#43 Solar System

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Posted 17 July 2012 - 06:49 PM

Newser, Wow! Thank you for responding and with such detail.

I mean it's rather easy for me to sit in the comforts of my home having absolutely no concept of the behind the scenes workings of a major television organization and ask why? But as a viewer watching, I think one can ask why?
It's as if CNN Worldwide ties their own hands. Each organization acts as if the other doesn't exist instead of utilizing the recources they have readily available. Until recently CNN USA rarely acknkowledged the existance of CNNI.
And CNNI from what I've seen fails to acknowledge CNN ESP. I've never watched CNN ESP (not available) and if I did, I'm assuming they don't acknowledge the existance of the others, I just find that bewildering.

CNN is not inventing the wheel here, they've already done that... So, why not attain reports from their sister networks? Even with the closing of bureaus and releasing numerous correspondents, the news still needs to be covered. A live shot may not be opportune, but is a recorded report too much to ask?

I ask these questions because, almost daily I watch South American reports from other networks and wonder why I'm not seeing these same stories on CNNI (which made ponder if it was a geographical thing between the sister networks).

I'm not going to start knocking CNNI cause the areas the do cover, they do a pretty damn good job obviously. The thing is why do they act as if South America doesn't exist?

Edited by Solar System, 18 July 2012 - 04:30 PM.


#44 Solar System

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Posted 19 July 2012 - 08:00 AM

The good news keeps pouring in for CNN International.



New report shows CNN International as top news channel in Africa (More evidence that you can't judge CNN by U.S. ratings alone) Article by David Zurawick



http://www.baltimore...84.story?page=1

#45 newser

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Posted 19 July 2012 - 10:06 PM

It's rather bold for Tony to claim CNNI is a 'top news channel in Africa'. The survey covers only seven countries (up from five a few years ago, yay!) - there are 54 countries on the continent. And it represents only a fraction of population (Africa is home to about a billion people), i.e. 'a universe of 3.3 million working adults in the top 13% of populations by income'. The press release doesn't mention it, but I'm sure these are all affluent influencers, global travelers and key decision makers. :mrgreen:

Edited by newser, 19 July 2012 - 10:07 PM.


#46 Carolina Argentina

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Posted 20 July 2012 - 12:31 AM

Newser, Newser, Newser. Lighten out. You're being too nitpicky.

The press release clearly states what the applicable group is:

CNN has significantly beaten its rivals in the latest EMS Africa survey, confirming its position as the single most watched international broadcaster on the continent – winning seven out of ten of the continent's key audiences across all platforms every month – according to results released today by Ipsos Synovate. (emphasis added)



Clearly it's only the affluent, etc. people who can afford to purchase these stations. And the competition all broadcasts in English. That leaves out a large proportion of TV watchers, let alone those who have access to a TV. And like any market research poll, it doesn't claim to ask everyone in the target group.


Edited by Carolina Argentina, 20 July 2012 - 12:33 AM.


#47 newser

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Posted 20 July 2012 - 01:43 AM

Newser, Newser, Newser. Lighten out. You're being too nitpicky.

The press release clearly states what the applicable group is:



CNN has significantly beaten its rivals in the latest EMS Africa survey, confirming its position as the single most watched international broadcaster on the continent – winning seven out of ten of the continent's key audiences across all platforms every month – according to results released today by Ipsos Synovate. (emphasis added)




Clearly it's only the affluent, etc. people who can afford to purchase these stations. And the competition all broadcasts in English. That leaves out a large proportion of TV watchers, let alone those who have access to a TV. And like any market research poll, it doesn't claim to ask everyone in the target group.


Ok, I was cynical about the "affluent", "influencers", "opinion makers", "C-suites" and others in the context of our discussion about this a few weeks ago. Here's some more details on who these target groups are in this particular survey.

They separated respondents into ten different groups and the estimate is there's around 3.3 million of them across seven countries. The results are representative of this group, which is perfectly fine, but that still doesn't give CNN the bragging right to say it's the most watched channel on the entire continent.

I'm aware it sounds nitpicky, but I'm also pretty sure there are people who fit in any of the ten target groups in 47 countries that weren't part of the survey (Egypt, Algeria, Namibia for example). That doesn't necessarily mean that CNNI's numbers would be much different than they are, maybe they would be even better, we don't know. Until we find out, there's no justification in saying CNNI is most watched on the entire continent. It's just a lousy PR spin which, in absence of any other surveys or rating measurments, regularly attracts media attention.

Imagine Mitt Romney's (or Barack Obama's) campaign claiming he's leading in polls in the entire country and then finding out the poll was conducted in only seven states.

Edited by newser, 20 July 2012 - 01:44 AM.


#48 modlib

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Posted 20 July 2012 - 07:13 PM

Newser, as you might expect, I find your cynicism to be spot on. Your analysis along with the PDF you posted were enlightening, as usual. It really put the survey in context.
That being said...
I've given careful consideration to the type of ads I see while watching CNN and maybe I should revise my position. After all, I am one of the few, the proud, the CNN target demographic. Imagine the smug satisfaction I get from being affluent enough to have the disposable income for erectile dysfunction pharmacuticals, disposable catheders, performance enhancers, and cadillacs. Of course, as the ad from the American Petroleum Institute states, I am reaping high yields from my virtually nonexistent vast investments in big energy, which is why I say Drill Baby Drill! As a result, I'm so grateful that CNN advertises a sleezy reputable TaxMaster that specializes in tax evasion preparation to help me protect my hard-earned affluence. The hallmark of my academic success and career achievement is that I can watch former CNBC poptart journalist anchor personality, Princess Erin Burnett, giggle/jiggle her way through that cringe-fest of a newscast all while managing to hold down my dinner. Cue the Citigroup ad now. Next up, I am informed by the once great newsman Anderson Cooper of the banal talking points from each political party while he sits there looking bored stiff serious with furrowed brow. Finally, I maintain my cultural elite status by watching the worldly, sophisticated Brit, Piers Morgan, interview someone I don't give a shit about important. It is the perfect nightcap to a long hard day of working decision making and trash talkin' at the water cooler social influencing. So congratulations CNN on being the most popular newscast of the richest people in 7 of 56 African nations. Really, I feel more sophisticated and enlightened already.
Disclaimer: Yes, the above comment is dripping with disdain and sarcasm. I hope some of you see similar TV ads while watching CNN domestic or my comments make little sense.
In all seriousness though, Solar System is right, CNNI deserves some legitimate credit for being a newscast that is gaining popularity around the world. Good for them. I just don't think CNN domestic should be trying to soak up all the credit.

#49 newser

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Posted 23 July 2012 - 08:11 PM

Just read your post, modlib - and it's hilarious! Spot on, too!

Edited by newser, 23 July 2012 - 08:11 PM.


#50 modlib

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Posted 27 July 2012 - 03:50 PM

I'm shocked. This is a potential game changer...

http://www.huffingto..._n_1710321.html




#51 Solar System

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Posted 27 July 2012 - 04:19 PM

Modlib with the BREAKING NEWS!


Walton said he doesn't expect that to change after he leaves.
"We kind of know who we are and our corporate colleagues know who we are and there has always been great support internally that we're going to be a news organization," he said.


The problem is... the viewers don't know who you are.


I just ask, why did it take so long? And why wait until the end of the year making everyone uncomfortable? I'm sure he'll go out with a nice little severance package, so won't waste an ounce of pity.

#52 newser

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Posted 27 July 2012 - 04:23 PM

This will be a game changer if the job is offered to a person who is not already part of Walton's management team. I guess we'll have to wait a few moths to find out the name officially, but I'm sure Page Six will inform us about some names under consideration in no time. Hopefully it won't be Jeff Zucker, as has already been suggested, or CNN might start airing reality shows.

Edited by newser, 27 July 2012 - 04:23 PM.


#53 ginnyfan

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Posted 27 July 2012 - 05:12 PM

Somehow I doubt it will be someone with an intent to turn CNN into a real news channel again, especially it's domestic channel. They will probably also keep on using CNNI as a cash cow since it became such a success for them, as that press release also says. More of the same or even worse, that's what I expect.
We'll back tomorrow , if they let us out of our cages. - Monita and Owen on CNN Today, 2008.

#54 Solar System

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Posted 31 July 2012 - 08:33 PM

This was posted on another site, and just thought it needed to be posted here too.



Amman is no longer a bureau. It was always more of a staging post for Baghdad.

And Baghdad is gone - just a producer with a phone and a laptop.

Jakarta and Bangkok also closed.

Buenos Aires is a freelancer.

Mexico has CNN-E, but no one posted there.

Dubai is home to CNNArabic.com for the web - but no bureau. Just website staff. Abu Dhabi down the road is now the hub.

Rome is empty.

Jerusalem is empty - and almost all of the staff (editor, producers, camera people) fired. Unclear if it will be filled, or people just flown in from London.

Same with Tokyo - that bureau is ideal for downsizing and no reporter replacement for Kyung Lah.

Santiago is not a bureau. There is a local CNN Chile (like CNN Turk and CNN-IBN India) but they have very little to do with the mothership.

So CNN International has been slashed to the bone --- meanwhile Atlanta has expanded with bosses, and more bosses, and even more bosses. No one can make a decision.

And, it obviously shows on air.

Time to clean houses, get rid of the executives with high 6 figure (and even 7 figure) salaries.

How many more stories do you think CNN could cover if the network got rid of a Senior Vice President on a $750,000 or $1.2 million dollar annual salary?

Wars in Congo & Mali, drug smuggling in Russia, violence in Guatemala etc etc

All stories shot down recently for 'lack of a budget' - meanwhile there are more and more fat cat managers sitting in Atlanta doing nothing more than going to meetings, checking Facebook and Googling.



Please let Time Warner find someone that is devoted to continually gathering quality news.

#55 Solar System

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Posted 03 August 2012 - 09:41 AM

From the "dc internationalist" blog


How do you fix a news channel with an identity crisis? You take a page from its younger and often under-appreciated sibling — CNN International. It is Time Warner’s jewel in the crown. With strong profits and ratings across the world, the global network must be unleashed on to American viewers. The question is whether executives in Atlanta and New-York have the guts to execute on such a bold move. Over the last decade, CNN’s revolving door has spun fast. Hence, simulcasting a good portion of CNNi programming on the American mothership may be the only solution to solving CNN’s woes. Not only will a re-positioning improve credibility in the public eye, CNN actually may steal some viewers from global news channels carving out niche audiences in the States. Will viewers be lost in process? Perhaps. Those who have a distaste for oatmeal over candy will likely gravitate elsewhere. But imagine the savings in production costs if CNN U.S. were to air International Desk with Hala Gorani or Connect The World with Becky Anderson in key time-slots.


http://dcinternation...l-in-the-crown/


"Under appreciated" is putting it mildly. The execs at CNN, the ocean size conglomerate with leaders who possess pond size views. They would rather air seven hours of the same program as opposed to simulcasting any of the CNNI programs.
The Newsrooms are a disaster, yet most of the morning and daytime programs follow this same format. It's not like the Newsrooms are some type of winning formula. Get some execs that are willing to take a chance and do something different and a whole lot less repetitious.

Really like Carol, and she was great when filling in for Kyra, but I don't know what has happened. The 0900 hour they should simulcast WBT and have Carol anchor the 1000 hour and change that format. Why not do a program based around Talk Back?
With Kyra's departure, Ashley is taking over her hour of Newsroom. Why not move Brooke to the 1100 hour and give Ashley the 1400 hour lead in to the TSR. 1200 hour: Newsroom International without a doubt the best show on daytime.

#56 modlib

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Posted 20 August 2012 - 02:31 PM

Solar System, your 31July2012 post was very interesting and insightful. I sure hope CNN Woldwide execs don't ruin what is left of their CNNI operations in the interest of pure profit maximization. As of now, CNN has a thing or two to learn from its "younger sibling" network and I would hate to see them gut it just to try and make their domestic version look better. I came across another article that shares the same sentiment...

http://www.salon.com...nn/?mobile.html

I thought SS would appreciate the very last paragraph, "Just become CNN International"


My response to this quote from your post...
"Time to clean houses, get rid of the executives with high 6 figure (and even 7 figure) salaries."
After all the articles lately that came out about CNN anchor salaries (Cooper 11mil, Blitzer 3mil, Morgan 6mil, Burnett 2mil annually) I think there is a TREMENDOUS amount of fat to be trimmed from anchor salaries as well. That's just a little free "profit maximization" advice I'll throw to CNN.

Edited by modlib, 20 August 2012 - 02:37 PM.


#57 Solar System

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Posted 21 August 2012 - 03:38 PM

I thought SS would appreciate the very last paragraph, "Just become CNN International"


Wouldn't that be something? But I'm not greedy, they don't have to become CNNI, just simulcast a few of their shows (I don't think that's asking too much). :P

I just think it's a crying shame that foreign channels can come in and provide better and more informative broadcasts than the domestic networks. You get "actual" news and quite a bit of U.S. news, news that the domestic networks fail to cover because their too busy replaying and discussing political sound-bites.


Was reading a David Zurawik article and he again referenced a Hillary Clinton statement:

"Viewership of Al Jazeera is going up in the United States because it's real news," Secretary of State Hillary Clinton told a Senate Foreign Affairs panel last year. "You may not agree with it, but you feel like you're getting real news around the clock instead of a million commercials and, you know, arguments between talking heads and the kind of stuff that we do on our news which, you know, is not particularly informative to us, let alone foreigners."



#58 modlib

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Posted 21 August 2012 - 06:21 PM

"Viewership of Al Jazeera is going up in the United States because it's real news," Secretary of State Hillary Clinton told a Senate Foreign Affairs panel last year. "You may not agree with it, but you feel like you're getting real news around the clock instead of a million commercials and, you know, arguments between talking heads and the kind of stuff that we do on our news which, you know, is not particularly informative to us, let alone foreigners."

Amen, Secretary Clinton, Amen. I wish satellite providers carried Al Jazeera across the country. Unfortunately, here in the Midwest, a vocal minority of people think the mere act of having Al Jazeera available to watch on TV will undermine national security by converting normal, rational people to Sharia-loving, American hating, suicidal terrorists. As if CNN hasn't made me crazy enough already. :lol:

#59 Solar System

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Posted 20 September 2012 - 07:48 PM

Second Israeli Video Provider to Drop CNN International



Can you blame them?

#60 Carolina Argentina

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Posted 21 September 2012 - 12:01 AM

Yes.



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