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#1 Solar System

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Posted 10 April 2012 - 05:27 AM

No Woman's Land: On the Frontlines with Female Reporters

You need not be a journalist or a self-proclaimed news junkie to read and appreciate this book... No Woman's Land. It reads as a compilation of short stories. But these stories stay with you, some even necessitating an immediate second read. I cheated a bit and flipped to the end of the story and read the mini-bio on each of the journalist prior to actually reading her story. It allowed me to paint a bit of a picture of whom I was reading (at least in my mind it did).

Some of the journalist in this book were familiar to me; having read their work, poured over their pictures or watched their reports. Admittedly, most of the journalist were unfamiliar to me. However, this did not make their story any less compelling. Though it was because of the journalist I call my absolute favorite, as to the very reason I purchased this book. Rather the very reason, the release of this book came to my attention.

When watching a particular piece - as a viewer you often get caught up with report, not often thinking about what the journalist experienced in their attempts to acquire the necessary information. Well this book a brings a portion of what journalist specifically female journalist go through while in the field. The mental strength these women possess comes through and make this book a fantastic read.


No Woman's Land :thumbup: :thumbup:
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#2 Solar System

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Posted 10 April 2012 - 05:31 AM

INSI is the organization responsible for comprising No Woman's Land. And subsequently their site has led me to addtional books by various female journalist.







The Woman who fell from the Sky: An American journalist in Yemen

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Under an Afghan Sky: A memoir of Captivity
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Colonel Gaddafi's Hat (Had no idea Alex Crawford had a book, just ordered this one).
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Edited by Solar System, 11 April 2012 - 06:27 PM.


#3 modlib

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Posted 10 April 2012 - 11:31 PM

No Woman's Land: On the Frontlines with Female Reporters

You need not be a journalist or a self-proclaimed news junkie to read and appreciate this book... No Woman's Land. It reads as a compilation of short stories. But these stories stay with you, some even necessitating an immediate second read. I cheated a bit and flipped to the end of the story and read the mini-bio on each of the journalist prior to actually reading her story. It allowed me to paint a bit of a picture of whom I was reading (at least in my mind it did).

Some of the journalist in this book were familiar to me; having read their work, poured over their pictures or watched their reports. Admittedly, most of the journalist were unfamiliar to me. However, this did not make their story any less compelling. Though it was because of the journalist I call my absolute favorite, as to the very reason I purchased this book. Rather the very reason, the release of this book came to my attention.


This book looks fascinating. I searched for it on my B&N Nook but it didn't find it. I searched on Amazon and was directed to the UK version of Amazon. The book on UK Amazon is currently sold out. I assume if it sells enough they will print more. I will keep it on my book "wishlist" and will hopefully get my hands on it soon. Thanks for sharing, cnn-domestic Solar System!!

#4 Houston

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Posted 11 April 2012 - 04:31 PM

I was lucky enough to have gotten a copy from Amazon UK last month. Of course, I ordered it because Hala had contributed an essay, but I found myself completely entranced by the other journalist's stories. From those on major TV networks, like Jennifer Griffin, to print journos and photographers the stories are fascinating. The essays are short, a few pages, but pack a punch.

I think next up to read by a journalist is the Anthony Shadid book, House of Stone.

(And yeah, that name change is going to take a while to sink in.)

#5 Solar System

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Posted 11 April 2012 - 06:33 PM

Modlib,

Try INSI's actual site, here is the link.

http://www.newssafet....php?page=20491

Houston, didn't you tell me you were going to get Rachel's book too? Her book is getting some excellent reviews,

Fascinated with all aspects of the Solar System, seemed like a perfect fit.

Edited by Solar System, 11 April 2012 - 09:16 PM.


#6 Solar System

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Posted 24 April 2012 - 04:45 AM

Bearing Witness: DVD

This documentary by Barbara Kopple chronicles five female journalist: Marie Colvin, Molly Bingham, Janine de Giovanni, Mary Rogers and May Ying Welsh.

I purchased this DVD some years ago simply because of Marie Colvin. Always have admired her, funny I don't even remember how she came to my attention. All I know is that I tried to read everything she wrote.
Then when the documentary was released, I remember paying extra to get the DVD as opposed to the VHS copy. Now instead of reading her work, here was an opportunity to watch and observe Marie at work. And being a visual person, this was just something I had to get.

I remember watching the DVD, and coming away sooo incredibly disappointed, that was 2006 I believe. As soon as I heard that Marie died this past February, I went to watch this DVD and just could not find it. Now, here it is the end of April and I just found it (and as it always happens, you find something as soon as you stop looking for it). Obviously, since I was disappointed, I didn't place it on the shelf with all my other docs.

Anyhow, I sat down and watched the DVD, this time taking in the whole documentary. I now realize why I was so disappointed. I was only interested in the portion of the DVD that featured Marie. And since their were four other women featured, there simply wasn't enough of Marie. It simply amazes me how shallow I can be at times.

Watching this DVD for the second time some five plus years later, it truly was a different experience altogether.

May Ying Welsh: is a producer for Al Jazeera who was instrumental for both sides due to her fluency in Arabic. She also took you on her early struggle of being mixed race.
Mary Rogers: Anyone who watches CNN knows of Mary. And Ben is also featured pretty prominently. Mary questions, how long can she do this?
Molly Bingham: A photographer who was kidnapped in the beginning of the Iraq war. Molly takes the viewers back to her cell where she was kept captive for seven days.
Janine de Giovanni: This is the part of the doc that irritated me so much. Why would I be interested in this woman getting married and trying on her wedding dress? That was how I felt then, but watching it now, how different I feel. After Marie, I found her story the most interesting, compelling and amazing. I totally just missed, ignored or just flat didn't care about all of her experiences. What she went through in Chechnya is worth watching just for that. To put it in perspective, here is a woman that can easily match the experiences and accomplishments of Christiane Amanpour. In the doc, Janine struggles with giving up the road/travel aspect - getting married, becoming a mother and becoming more of a print journalist. After watching this again, Janine has written a few books and made a few docs of her own that I now plan on looking to acquire if available.
Marie Colvin: The amazing and unbelievable Marie. No explanation needs to be given.

This DVD is awesome, so glad I found it.

#7 Solar System

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Posted 30 April 2012 - 12:16 AM

The Explorer's Code: Novel by Kitty Pilgrim
Read this book maybe 8 months ago, thought I would mention it here since Part II of the series will be released on June 26, 2012 - (The Stolen Chalice).



An excerpt of The Explorer's Code from Kitty Pilgrim's site
Oceanographer Cordelia and archaeologist John Sinclair team up to search for a deed in some of the most sophisticated and romantic places in the world – the principality of Monaco, a Mediterranean voyage of the Queen Victoria ocean liner, a lavish country estate outside of London and a palatial apartment in Paris. Chased by a gang of ruthless killers, the search continues to exotic locales such as the archaeological ruins of Ephesus, Turkey and the high arctic archipelago of Svalbard, Norway. Along the way Cordelia and Sinclair encounter a team of British virologists trying to decode the genome of the 1918 pandemic, a Russian oligarch and his entourage, a famous supermodel, a world champion fencer, and a cult of religious fanatics. Filled with high adventure, elegant lifestyle, and international intrigue,



This was a great book. And I much prefer non-fiction, I can't stand being in suspense. If reading fiction, I'll usually read the end pages first to find out what happened and just get all of that out of the way. I enjoy what led up to the end, everything that transpired in-between. But with this book I forced myself to read it like normal person would - and I'm glad that I did.
This book came to my attention when I saw Christine Romans interviewing Kitty on American Morning. Many places and events in the book are what Kitty experienced as a journalist.

Kitty Pilgrim worked as a CNN correspondent and news anchor for 24 years. As a New York-based reporter her normal beat included politics and economics. Her assignments have taken her around the world and she reported on political and security developments in Russia, China, Venezuela, Cuba, the Middle East, North Korea and South Africa. Pilgrim anchored her own CNN morning show, “Early Edition” in 1998-1999 and was anchor for prime time broadcasts at CNN from 2001-2010.

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This pic on the left reminds me of The English Patient movie :)

Edited by Solar System, 30 April 2012 - 12:48 AM.


#8 Solar System

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Posted 30 April 2012 - 12:16 AM

Pretty cool that INSI actually found this site and read the reviews. But as previously mentioned, only became aware of the organization because Hala was one of the forty journalist who contributed to the book.

From INSI twitter:
INSI@newssafety Some fantastic comments about 'No Woman's Land' on http://CNNfan.org -thanks for all the support! http://bit.ly/I4maL6 #journ #journalism

Edited by Solar System, 30 April 2012 - 12:50 AM.


#9 modlib

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Posted 30 April 2012 - 08:59 PM

Pretty cool that INSI actually found this site and read the reviews. But as previously mentioned, only became aware of the organization because Hala was one of the forty journalist who contributed to the book.

From INSI twitter:
INSI@newssafety Some fantastic comments about 'No Woman's Land' on http://CNNfan.org -thanks for all the support! http://bit.ly/I4maL6 #journ #journalism



Awesome - what a great mention. And here I thought we were just talkin' amongst ourselves! ;)

#10 Houston

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Posted 02 May 2012 - 01:49 AM

Wow. Neat. Good thing it is such an outstanding book and we gave it two thumbs up. And it is back in stock at Amazon.uk, but only nine copies left according to the site.

I did get Rachel’s book and have read the intro. It is an interesting argument that the US has gotten used to being in a perpetual state of war. Didn’t Eisenhower warn us of this? What is really scary is I watch her just about every night, and when I read the book I hear it in her voice.

But, I must admit I’ve pretty much been reading A Song of Ice and Fire. Am now halfway through A Feast for Crows and one more book in the series after that. So far. I think there is suppose to be at least two more.
Then maybe I’ll get back to the non-fiction. Picked up The Crisis of Zionism by Peter Beinart when I bought the new Steven King last week. What’s the saying - so many books and so little time...

#11 Houston

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Posted 07 June 2012 - 03:47 PM

RIP Ray Bradbury.
Fahrenheit 451 should be mandatory reading for everyone.

#12 Carolina Argentina

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Posted 08 June 2012 - 02:38 PM

The book How to Avoid Being Killed in a War Zone: The Essential Survival Guide for
Dangerous Places by Rosie Garthwaite was very popular here in Egypt during the 25 January (2011) Revolution for obvious reasons. She is a reporter for AJA.

From the Forward by Rageh Omaar:

Rosie's book is a great collection of essays, reflections, memories, anecdotes and self-counseling confessionals by reporters, many of them friends and colleagues of both of us. They are at times funny and revealing, and at other times both sobering and refreshing.

I pick it up occasionally and read a few entries or a few pages.

#13 Solar System

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Posted 08 June 2012 - 03:12 PM

^^^ Have that book but haven't got around to it yet. So, are you not reading much because you're busy or because the book just hasn't grabbed you?



Just finished Under an Afghan Sky which I'll post my thoughts on later. Super excited to start reading my latest book on Mussolini.

#14 Carolina Argentina

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Posted 08 June 2012 - 09:02 PM

It's not designed to be read straight through. You'll get a section title "Teamwork" & 9 paragraphs -- each of which has a separate title "Try to Make Contact With the Rest of the Team Before You Travel", "Get to Know Your Team" -- which run from a few lines to half a page. Perfect to read when you have a few minutes to waste.

#15 Carolina Argentina

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Posted 08 June 2012 - 09:05 PM

Another excellent War Correspondents at Work book is Dispatches by Michael Herr. Won a Pulitzer, I think it was. About his time as a WC in Viet Nam, lo these many years ago. It's still in print after 40 some years. Really captured the absurdity of the war there an the personalities of the WCs.

#16 Houston

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Posted 09 June 2012 - 12:57 AM

This one is about 10 now, but some may not have heard of it - Flirting with Danger: Confessions of a Reluctant War Reporter by Siobhan Darrow. Was one of my favorites. She was a war corredpondent with CNN, I used to look forward to her reports and then one day she was gone. Then the book came out and explained a lot. Lots of behind the scenes looks and brutally honest.

#17 Solar System

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Posted 13 June 2012 - 08:17 PM

^^^ Sounds like a book I'll have to put on my list, thanks for the tip Houston.

>>>



Just finished Under an Afghan Sky - A Memoir of Captivity by Melissa Fung

Mellissa is a journalist for the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation on her second trip to Afghanistan, sent to cover the war. Melissa was kidnapped by three armed men claiming to be part of the Taliban. Mellissa was taken away by vehicle, forced to hike several miles up a mountain and then by motorbike to an abandon house. Behind the house was a hole in the ground with an opening slightly smaller than a manhole cover. The hole was approximately eight feet deep and led to a tunnel. The twelve foot long tunnel led to an opening which would be what her captures called Mellisa's room for the next twenty-eight days. Her room was approximately six feet long, three feet wide and five feet high supported by a couple of painted wooden beams.

That alone would make you think this book would be a hard-to-put-down page turner. From the time Mellissa was placed in the tunnel, trapped each day with one of her captures - this book died a slow and painful death. While anyone who reads this book and knew of her ordeal would be terribly relieved that for the most part her captures treated her well. But this book seemed to trivialize her kidnapping.

The writer elected to focus more on how many cigarettes she smoked while in the hole and how many creme-filled cookies her captures ate. The three hundred plus pages of silly conversation and annoying letters just seemed like page fillers. Though the trips down memory lane did give the reader an idea of who Mellissa was as a person and as a journalist.

I kept thinking - this book has to get better, anyone who survives this kind of ordeal, has to have a compelling story. Well, anyway you look at it, it is a compelling story just not laid out in this book. Five pathetic pages were devoted to her release and return to work.

I suppose it was my fault expecting that this book would expound on her release and the aftermath of her kidnapping. What it was like to see her family and friends again for the first time. How long did it take for her to return to work? Did her wounds cause permanent damage? Would she return to Afghanistan? Does the CBC still use the same fixer?

This book could have really been something, but unfortunately came off more like a field trip gone wrong.

#18 Carolina Argentina

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Posted 28 June 2012 - 02:48 PM

The Iraqi Bookseller http://www.ensatinapress.com/

Book written by Anthony Shadid about a particular bombing on a particular street in a ME nation. Don't know anything more about it.

#19 Solar System

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Posted 16 July 2012 - 08:01 PM

Janine di Giovanni is one of the journalist profiled in the 2005 documentary Bearing Witness. As noted in a previous post, I came to appreciate Janine's work and accomplishments upon the second viewing of the documentary. Also, said I was going to order her books because she seems like such a fascinating person with so much to share (though I haven't got around to it yet), did find her amazing 2011 article on the net.
When watching the documentary, thought to myself I'd be surprise if Janine and Bruno stay together, these two combustible people - how could they? Well, I was partially wrong, sixteen years is a long time.

Lengthy but very moving article:
http://www.guardian....r-memoir-family

Her books:

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#20 Carolina Argentina

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Posted 16 July 2012 - 09:48 PM

SS, Was she interviewed by Christianne Amanpour recently? I know I recently saw her on CNN... CA



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