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Fareed Zakaria


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#41 Xabat

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Posted 21 March 2012 - 12:55 AM

Want Fareed to speak at your corporate event? That'll be $75,000 please. I'm sure he'd be worth it, but wow. Not a bad effort for a few hours work.

Fareed Zakaria, host of the weekly CNN show Fareed Zakaria GPS, has a rate of $75,000, as reported in Harper’s. His general topic on the show is geopolitics, but he has covered Occupy Wall Street and the European financial crisis and interviewed Mohamed A. El-Erian, the CEO of the investment firm Pimco. Over the years, he has been retained for speeches by numerous financial firms, including Baker Capital, Catterton Partners, Driehaus Capital Management, ING, Merrill Lynch, Oak Investment Partners, Charles Schwab, and T. Rowe Price, according to the website of the Royce Carlton speakers bureau.

Zakaria didn’t respond to a request for comment, either, but a CNN spokeswoman said: “We have full confidence in Fareed Zakaria’s professionalism and judgment and do not think his outside speaking appearances interfere with his CNN responsibilities on his weekly show or his commentary on CNN.”


http://www.cjr.org/f...12.php?page=all

#42 Solar System

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Posted 21 March 2012 - 01:46 AM

As long as it's not a contract conflict, nothing wrong with earning an extra buck or two. But, I find it a bit surprising and disappointing that he didn't respond. Why not respond if you feel you're doing the right thing? Even if you say something to the effect, my finances are my personal business.

#43 newser

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Posted 21 March 2012 - 03:04 AM

As a viewer, I've got no problem with this, cause Fareed's role on CNN is not a journalistic one, he's more of an opinion guy/analyst/moderator, therefore it's perfectly fine if he monetizes his expertise elsewhere, as long as he continues to present his own views and not views of companies he earns this extra money from.

#44 Houston

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Posted 21 March 2012 - 03:53 PM

A lot of the CNNer's can be bought for speaking engagements, for example Coooooper, Sara Sidner, Nancy Grace, Ali Velshi.
Personally, I think it's a bad idea, just like I hate that they use air time to hawk their books.

#45 modlib

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Posted 21 March 2012 - 06:33 PM

Want Fareed to speak at your corporate event? That'll be $75,000 please. I'm sure he'd be worth it, but wow. Not a bad effort for a few hours work.
http://www.cjr.org/f...12.php?page=all


Allow me a comment on the broader point...


I found this article very interesting and it brings up important issues about Wall Street's influence and the disclosure of "other" sources of income of prominent journalists. It seems reasonable and logical to me that disclosing paid speaking engagements would clarify any potential conflicts of interest. If there is nothing wrong, there is nothing to hide. Honestly, the paid speeches don't bother me that much because I think the proof is in their product. Harwood said it best... Speaking fees are “to me more an appearance issue than an actual conflict, but nobody should be under the illusion that our credibility doesn't need shoring up.”


What bothers me most about this article is who they chose to single out. I find it very suspicious that many of the people accused of being influenced by Wall Street speaking fees are people who have actually spoken out against Wall Street. Perhaps suspicious is too strong a word, for I risk sounding paranoid, but it seems ironic that Tett, Lewis, Stewart, and Zakaria are all "named" but the author goes on to defend CNBC's and Bloomberg's practices when it comes to speaking engagements. I do commend CNBC and Bloomberg for strong policies against any appearance of impropriety caused by speaking fees. Good for them for wanting to run a clean operation. But I am reminded of a quote from Warren Buffett when everyone (including CNBC) was cheering on the housing bubble as a rising tide for all boats; he said "When the tide goes out, you can see who was swimming naked." In the wake of the financial crash, we could all see Wall Street was buck naked and standing uncomfortably close was the equally naked financial "journalists" prominent on CNBC and to a lesser extent Bloomberg.


Let's get real. The "paid speeches are influence" argument is a bit of a red herring to me. In theory, speeches for money sound like the perfect vehicle for corruption, and in some instances it may very well be. But the most insidious and EFFECTIVE influence that Wall Street wields over journalists isn't the cash transaction; rather it is the soft influence of access, luxury, and fame. CNBC and Bloomberg are chock full of young, eager to please neophytes who want to impress the rich and powerful so that they may travel in the same luxurious, exotic circles. Many do not possess a true journalistic ethic. I don't know how you regulate against such influence but I can see with my own eyes that CNBC is little more than a public relations operation for Wall Street and large, influential corporations. I tend to single out CNBC only because of their ratings advantage over all other financial news channels. They clearly have the larger reach to the general public. I don't mean to paint everyone at CNBC with such a broad brush. Harwood seems like the real deal to me - he is an accomplished, thoughtful journalist. As for Bartiromo, for all her flaws, she may well be an egomaniacal diva, but occasionally she has the temerity to bite the hand that feeds her (not often enough in my opinion). Mark Haines was a rare skeptic in a sea of sycophants.


If we are to believe paid speeches influence journalists, wouldn't the proof be in the news product? CNBC, Bloomberg, and WSJ should be as pure and impartial as we could expect, according to Starobin. Other journalists mentioned in the article, would, according to this theory, display some favorable coverage proportional to their fees. I ask you all, as fellow news consumers, does this ring true? This article goes after those who were notoriously critical of Wall Street and defends those who carried water for them. Call me paranoid, but that seems suspicious to me. I do not want to cast aspersions on the author, Paul Starobin, because I have no idea who he is. The influence of paid speeches is a legitimate topic to be explored and I appreciate the nuance that Starobin displays in the article. I just hope this is the start of a larger conversation about Wall Street's influence on those journalists who cover them.


#46 Houston

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Posted 23 March 2012 - 05:09 AM

"CNBC and Bloomberg are chock full of young, eager to please neophytes who want to impress the rich and powerful so that they may travel in the same luxurious, exotic circles. Many do not possess a true journalistic ethic."

Never a truer statement said, and I believe you could easily fill in CNN, FOX, MSNBC at the first and not just the young. There are reports and pictures of the likes of Blitzer and Cooper and Guppie etc who just loooove hanging out in those circles. Of course, Cooper is a Vanderbilt so he was born into them.

#47 Solar System

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Posted 23 March 2012 - 06:33 PM

Modlib, excellent points!

But isn't that human nature? As humans it's hard not to see things through a glass house. But nonetheless, I agree with all you've addressed.

#48 magnel69

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Posted 25 March 2012 - 12:41 AM

Fareed Zakaria's presentation on "Global lessons:The GPS Roadmap for Saving Healthcare". was very informative. I hope this will "open the eyes" of the American Politicians as the right pathway for America's healthcare system.

He should be a US Senator. This man is very knowledgeable and always has brilliant ideas.

Why didn't Dr.Sanjay Gupta think of this?

#49 magnel69

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Posted 04 April 2012 - 11:30 PM

Congrats to Fareed Zakaria GPS for winning the PeaBody Award. You deserve it.

#50 diddy5

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Posted 05 April 2012 - 01:18 AM

Congrats to him and to CNN. Well deserved!

#51 modlib

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Posted 11 April 2012 - 04:45 AM

Agreed, congrats on the Peabody!

Disclosure on my earlier comments about Zakaria's speaking engagements...
I saw him at a university sponsored speaking event last year and he was great! He's smart, insightful, and a pleasure to listen to. He was worth every penny ;)

#52 modlib

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Posted 11 April 2012 - 04:57 AM

But isn't that human nature? As humans it's hard not to see things through a glass house.


Yes, it is human nature. That is an excellent point. But the best journalists are ones who push past their own interests and challenge those they are assigned to cover. Houston is right that this applies to more than financial journalists - it seems to be a problem plaguing cable tv news in general. The more these cable news anchors become overpaid celebrities the more their "human nature" compels them to defend those in power. It's why CNN just keeps fading into irrelevance. More infotainment to distract us from the real issues.

That being said, given the financial crisis we have experienced, the biz journalists were exposed as being in a class by themselves for journalistic corruption and self-dealing. When it comes to vast sums of money and extreme luxury, Wall Street simply has much more to offer these sycophants than any other power structure in the country.

#53 Solar System

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Posted 11 April 2012 - 09:28 PM

In a nutshell, you summed it up.
And that certainly is what CNN has become infotainment and what makes it even worse, they seem proud of the fact.

#54 kk_kev

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Posted 17 April 2012 - 11:19 AM

http://freebeacon.co...ture-of-fareed/

CNN TALK SHOW HOST ZAKARIA COULD BE ON OBAMA SHORT LIST FOR A TOP DIPLOMATIC POST IN A MORE FLEXIBLE SECOND TERM

Personally, I think Fareed is more suitable in the role of a pundit. Plus that means CNNUS would have 1 less decent show, and a big loss too personality-wise.
previosuly kev

#55 newser

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Posted 17 April 2012 - 11:46 AM

Author of the article really did his best to portray Fareed as someone who hates America and adores the Ayatollah.

reason for late edit: just a typo

Edited by newser, 17 April 2012 - 07:37 PM.


#56 Houston

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Posted 10 August 2012 - 10:04 PM

Aw.

"Time editor-at-large and CNN host Fareed Zakaria was suspended from both places for a month on Friday after admitting to lifting parts of a story from the New Yorker."

#57 Carolina Argentina

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Posted 11 August 2012 - 12:23 AM

Oh, Fareed, I'm so disappointed in you.

#58 Jon

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Posted 11 August 2012 - 01:57 AM

Very disappointing news. It's a bit disheartening, really, since I held him in such a high standard.

#59 dezbee2008

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Posted 11 August 2012 - 02:53 AM

I had to read it twice to make sure it was true. But I still can't believe it. :(
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#60 Carolina Argentina

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Posted 11 August 2012 - 04:26 AM

And this is the second time he's done it, according to the story.



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